WORKERS TURN TO CANNABIS FOR JOB-RELATED PAIN

A recent study examined the use of cannabis among workers with work-related injuries or illnesses in Ontario, Canada. Researchers interviewed 1,196 participants and found that approximately 27% of them used cannabis, with about 14% reporting its use to alleviate their work-related conditions.

Workers who used cannabis products as a result of workplace injuries did so to treat pain, psychological distress and sleep problems, associated with their injuries. It also found that cannabis use outside the workplace did not affect workplace injury risk.

Some of the injured workers using cannabis for their conditions received advice from healthcare providers, but the majority did not.

The research suggests that healthcare providers should engage in discussions with injured workers regarding their potential use of cannabis.

In Victoria the law continues to place restrictions on how cannabis, including medical cannabis, is used. To find out more enrol in our OHS implications of Medicinal Cannabis lives how here.

Access the study here

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