STUDY SHOWS BENZENE'S ROLE IN LEUKEMIA DEATHS

Researchers in Brazil have published a study looking at how exposure to the chemical benzene affects the health of workers. Collecting data from 2006 to 2011 they found the annual death rate for leukemia among benzene-exposed workers was 4.5 per 100,000 people, compared to 2.6 per 100,000 for non-exposed workers.

This means that benzene-exposed workers were 1.7 times more likely to die from leukemia. Specific job roles like printers, laboratory assistants, laundry workers, chemists, and upholsterers had even higher risks of leukemia.

The study suggests a requirement for further measures, better rules and regulations protecting workers from this known cancer-causing chemical.

Access the study here

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