PSYCHOSOCIAL RISKS: TRAINING FALLS SHORT

Key findings from workshops and interviews conducted by WorkSafe WA in 2023, focusing on the psychosocial wellbeing of workers in mining industry reveal employers are increasingly aware of the need to train workers on issues like harassment and bullying, but the current approach of providing single, isolated training sessions has limited impact.

The workshops explored changes in the industry's attitudes towards behaviors that can cause psychological harm and found some positive shifts, while much work remains.  

The reports key findings include improved awareness of issues like sexual harassment and bullying, but still some silence on issues like sexual violence and homophobia.

Most employers agree on the need for psychosocial training, but it's often delivered as a single session, which research suggests is minimally effective and there's a lack of awareness about more impactful training methods.

The report also highlights confusion around managing psychosocial risks and incidents, inadequate victim-centric response processes, insufficient training for incident responders, and a lack of consideration for diverse experiences.

The report makes 23 recommendations, including adopting multiyear action plans for risk prevention and creating conversational pieces for ongoing discussions about psychosocial hazards during workplace meetings.

Access the full report here

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