JOB IMPACTS ON CAUSE OF DEATH

A Scandinavian study has investigated how job conditions relate to various causes of death. Researchers studied approximately 4.5 million Swedish adults from 2005 to 2019 to explore potential links between people's occupations and causes of death, such as heart problems or suicide.

They also assessed whether these job conditions changed over time. Researchers examined job information, focusing on job control (the level of control individuals have in their work) and job demands (the workload individuals face) to understand their potential impact on causes of death.

This analysis was conducted over several years, analysing recorded causes of death.

The findings indicated that individuals in jobs with low control or passive work had increased chances of dying from various causes, including heart problems or suicide. Men in high-strain jobs, characterized by high demand and low control, had higher risks of all-cause and heart-related deaths.

For women, low control, passive jobs, and high-strain jobs were associated with higher chances of dying from alcohol-related issues.

This study suggests a potential connection between job conditions and causes of death, with differences observed between men and women.

Access the study in full

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