ASK RENATA

Our health and safety committee meetings are always chaired by our manager. Am I within my rights to ask for the chair to be rotated?

It falls under the purview of the Committee to establish its own rules, including the possibility of implementing a rotating chairmanship alternating between employer and worker representatives at each meeting.

It's important to note that the committee's rules, known as terms of reference, can be modified by mutual agreement at any time. The Chairperson is responsible for upholding these rules and ensuring compliance.

The relevant provision in our OHS Act is section 72(5), which states: ‘Subject to this Act and the regulations, a health and safety committee may determine its own procedures.’

The following excerpt is taken from page 62 of WorkSafe's Employee Representation Guide:

The Health and Safety Committee (HSC) may find it necessary to establish procedures and regulations for planning and conducting meetings. Key considerations for the committee include:

  • Designating the meeting chairperson
  • Establishing a quorum requirement
  • Assigning responsibility for taking meeting minutes
  • Determining the issuer of the minutes
  • Drafting and distributing the meeting agenda
  • Establishing time frames for agenda items
  • Outlining decision-making processes

For more information on health and safety committees visit our webpage

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