HEAT AND FIRE RISKS: EMPLOYER OBLIGATIONS

With temperatures peaking in the low 40s in certain areas this week, Victorian workers face significant risks associated with extreme heat and fire danger. Employers must be prepared to make accommodations and ensure workers' safety.

A Total Fire Ban requires employers avoid work activities that could provide ignition sources. Its crucial bosses consult with workers, develop tailored strategies, and provide training on recognising fire risks and heat stress symptoms, like nausea, vomiting or dizziness, feeling weak, pale skin, heavy sweating, headaches, convulsions, and clumsiness.

To manage heat risks effectively, duty holders should reschedule work for cooler times of the day and in cooler locations, provide light yet protective clothing, extra rest breaks in cool areas, access to cool water for hydration, and use mechanical aids to reduce physical exertion.

Employers are reminded of their legal obligation to protect workers and the community. Our Heat webpage provides further guidance and includes an action plan for HSRs. 

HSRs may also find our Sunlight - ultraviolet UV radiation and Air Quality webpages helpful.

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