MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORT PREFERENCES IN CONSTRUCTION

The study has examined the help-seeking intentions and mental well-being of construction workers in the UK. A key challenge faced by designers of workplace interventions is low engagement with support services.

The study involved workers from two UK-based construction companies completing an online cross-sectional questionnaire designed to measure help-seeking intentions, levels of mental well-being, and worker attitudes towards workplace mental health support strategies.

It found that one-third of workers had experienced mental health difficulties in the past 6 months. Participants reported a preference for seeking support from informal sources like partners rather than formal sources like Mental Health First Aiders. There was also a link between age and help-seeking intentions.

The study suggests that tailored, informal workplace support networks may be beneficial in improving mental well-being among construction workers.

Access the study here

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