POSITIVE RESULTS OF SUICIDE PREVENTION

Research examining suicide trends among Australian construction workers between 2001 to 2019 suggest population-wide, male-specific, and sector-specific suicide prevention efforts are having an effect.

In many Western countries, including Australia, construction workers have been at elevated risk of suicide, compared to other workers.

A variety of suicide prevention initiatives have been implemented over time and this study, undertaken by researchers at Melbourne and Deakin Universities, sort to examine the net effect of those interventions.

Using 19 years of national suicide data, researchers reviewed mortality rates among construction workers, relative to other working males, comparing any percentage change.

Construction workers' overall suicide rate was 26.6 per 100,000 persons, compared to 13.2 per 100,000 for male workers.

Data indicates suicide rates actually declined in both cohorts, however a significant increase in the rate of decline for construction workers was evident over the 19-year study period, suggesting existing efforts should continue, and expand.

Read the report in detail here

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