YOUNG WORKER SAFETY: EMPLOYERS URGED TO ACT

Every day, approximately 200 young workers join the workforce. They have the highest likelihood of sustaining an injury within their first six months of employment.

Research shows employers can lack empathy and understanding about young workers' vulnerability, often failing to adequately induct, train, or communicate OHS issues appropriately. This can contribute to young workers not feeling supported to speak up if they feel something is unsafe.

We also know that young workers can be exceptionally vulnerable as they have lower awareness of OHS risks and often do not understand their legislated rights to a safe workplace. Additionally, up until now many have been taught to respect and listen to adult authority figures in their lives. 

Targeting employers of young workers, the Would you work for you? campaign aims to:

  • Increase awareness that young workers are a vulnerable group and at a higher risk of workplace injury
  • Increase awareness of the importance of ensuring young worker workplace safety
  • Encourage employers to put systems in place to ensure young workers receive appropriate training and induction

Failure to provide a safe and health workplace often goes hand in hand with other types of exploitation too. If anyone you know needs support, we encourage them to join their Union and contact the Young Workers’ Centre for advice, where they can learn more about employers' OHS obligations to young workers.

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