NEW ZEALAND PROHIBITS PFAS IN BEAUTY PRODUCTS

The Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) in New Zealand will ban the use of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in cosmetic products starting from December 31, 2026.

PFAS, known as 'forever chemicals', are used in various cosmetics like nail polish, shaving cream, and lipstick to improve durability and water resistance. However, they can accumulate in the body and have been associated with a range of adverse health outcomes.

In Australia, the historical use of PFAS in fire-fighting foams has resulted in increased levels being detected at sites like airports, Defence bases, and other sites where fire-fighting training has been conducted, or where fire suppression systems are installed for extinguishing liquid-fuel fires.

Firefighters exposed to PFASs have been shown to have higher PFAS levels in blood samples than the general population.

To date, no interventions have been shown to reduce PFAS levels.

NZ EPA is taking this precautionary step to protect consumers and the environment making New Zealand one of the first countries globally to act on PFAS.

More detailed information can be found on the NZ EPA website.

While understanding about the human health effects of long-term PFAS exposure is still developing, there is global concern about the persistence and mobility of these chemicals in the environment. Many countries have discontinued, or are progressively phasing out, their use

The Australian Government has worked since 2002 to reduce the use of certain PFAS. Learn more here.

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