BUILDING AUTHORITY SHAKE-UP: CULTURE ADDRESSED

The chief commissioner and several board members of Victoria's building regulator, the Victorian Building Authority (VBA), will not have their terms renewed. This decision comes as a response to concerns about the VBA's culture and its inability to oversee the construction sector effectively.

A total of five board positions, including Chief Commissioner Michelle McLean, will not be renewed. Some members decided not to continue their roles voluntarily, while others were not given the option to extend their terms by the Planning Minister, Sonya Kilkenny.

The VBA has faced scrutiny and criticism in recent times, with reports of an unsafe workplace culture and issues related to enforcing regulations in the construction industry. This scrutiny intensified after the suicide of a building inspector and revelations about builders avoiding necessary insurance.

The VBA's new CEO, Anna Cronin, has been tasked with changing the organization's culture and improving its ability to serve consumers and regulate the industry. Reforms are expected, and a regulatory statement will be released to address the issues within the VBA about its effectiveness and workplace culture.

It's long been recognised that poor workplace cultures pose a psychosocial hazard for workers, so it is encouraging to see steps taken to reform the systems of work. Relying solely on policies and procedure is seldom sufficient.

Source: The Age

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