Ask Renata

At my work we do MIG welding and grinding in the manufacturing of semi-trailers, but the fumes are not adequately captured... can you provide any info about mitigating the problem?

Welding fumes are a known cause of cancer but there's plenty that can be done to keep workers safe.

We think you’ll find WorkSafe Victoria’s guidance Controlling exposure to welding fumes contains all the information you’re looking for.

It includes information on reducing risks associated with MIG (metal inert gas) welding, including:

You may also find our webpage Welding - what are the issues? helpful. It includes links to further resources and information.

If you work involves welding in confined spaces, such as pressure vessels, please also refer to our Confined Spaces and Confined Spaces & Poorly Ventilated Areas webpages. They contain additional information on the very serious risks associated with welding in a confined space.

Worth noting: the AMWU are calling for a stricter limit on exposure to welding fumes and have recently launched a National Welding Fumes Exposure Register.

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