HOW HAZARDS COMBINE TO RAISE METABOLIC SYNDROME RISK

A study by researchers from Pusan National University and other South Korean institutions has found that workers exposed to multiple occupational hazards, even at low levels, are at higher risk of developing metabolic syndrome.

Metabolic syndrome includes conditions like hypertension, insulin intolerance, abdominal obesity, and dyslipidemia (problematic blood lipid levels).

About one in five workers globally, or around one billion people, suffer from this health issue.

The study urges employers to monitor and improve workplace conditions to reduce these risks.

Specific hazards linked to metabolic syndrome include night work, noise exposure, exposure to organic solvents, and heavy metals like copper, antimony, lead, iron, and manganese.

The study also identified 40 pairs of these risk factors that often led to metabolic syndrome. Further research is needed to understand the relationship better, but these findings highlight the importance of addressing multiple workplace hazards to protect workers' health.

Access the study in full

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