REDUCING MENTAL HEALTH-RELATED STIGMA

UK researchers have tested a program called ‘Prevail’ on a group of government employees to see if it improved mental health and reduced sickness absence associated with common psychological injuries like depression, anxiety, and stress.

Researchers used questionnaires and official records to measure the program's impact, which aimed to educate bosses and workers about low-intensity psychological interventions and reduce associated stigma.

The study involved over 1,000 employees in a large UK government institution, with some employees participating in the program while a control group did not.

Researchers claim the program received positive feedback from both employees and managers and appears to have successfully reduced self-stigma and the anticipation of stigma related to mental health problems.

'Prevail was highly evaluated by both the staff and their managers… (and) … produced significant reductions in self-stigma and anticipated stigma due to mental health difficulties.’

Access the full discussion paper here

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