Research

New research from Japanese University claims work stress can lead to tooth loss

A study of 1,200 workers between the ages of 25 and 50 from the Japan's Asahikawa Medical University and Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry has found that workers experiencing workplace stress in the form of an effort-reward imbalance were interestingly found to be 20% more likely to have lost one of more teeth. However the association was somewhat remedied by supportive supervisors, managers and positive industrial relations.

The researchers found that chronic stress and caused a decline in the immune system of the worker, leading to tissue destruction.

According to the researchers, oral diseases like caries and periodontal disease are a major public health problem and cost about $266 billion worldwide in productivity loss each year.

The story peaked our interest as yet another piece of research detailing the direct relationship between a workers mental and physical health, at a time when Work Cover claims for stress and mental injuries are climbing year over year. It's vital for us to be able to always be drawing the health connections between the physical and the mental as a movement.

Share Tweet

RELATED

TURKISH CYANIDE LANDSLIDE: 9 MINERS MISSING
On 13 February a cyanide-laced landslide swept into a valley, trapping nine miners who are still missing. The incident occurred at an open-pit gold mine in İliç, Erzincan, owned by a company...
Read More
FRANCE: AMAZON’S MASSIVE FINE FOR INTRUSIVE SURVEILLANCE
The French Data Protection Authority (CNIL) has fined Amazon France Logistique €32 million (AU 53 million) for implementing a surveillance system deemed excessively intrusive.
Read More
ABUSE IMPACTS DIFFER: SUPERVISORS OFTEN CULPRITS
Researchers at the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health in Japan categorised aggressive words and phrases into different types, including criticizing job performance, attacking personality and looks, and threatening life.
Read More