Research

Five musculoskeletal strategies identified
Researchers in Denmark have identified strategies for surgeons who are at high risk of work-related musculoskeletal pain but lack knowledge on how to adapt less physically demanding work postures in the operating theatre.

Based on a systematic literature review and interviews with Danish surgeons, the researchers found interventions to prevent and rehabilitate musculoskeletal pain need to promote individual behavioural changes, along with organisational, attitudinal and management changes.

Successful interventions depend on six factors: knowledge, skills, attitude, social influence, self-efficacy and expected outcomes. They propose five intervention strategies addressing these, which involve a combination of mandatory workshops with training sessions for surgeons and hospital management.

The strategies cover the benefits of physical exercise training on physical health, targeting vulnerable and painful body regions; using available physical ergonomics; incorporating micro-breaks into surgery time; work impacts on health: and prioritising surgeons' work-related musculoskeletal pain for management. 
Read more: Tina Dalagar, et al. Using an intervention mapping approach to develop prevention and rehabilitation strategies for musculoskeletal pain among surgeons. [Full article] BMC Public Health, online March 2019, doi: 10.1186/s12889-019-6625-4. Source: OHSAlert

Share Tweet

RELATED

CONTROVERSIAL RULING: ONE WORK GROUP FOR 170 STAFF
In a NSW decision that sets a worrying precedent, an employer has successfully argued that its workplace should only have one work group instead of the five determined by the WHS Regulator....
Read More
TRAINING GAPS LEAD TO $400K FINE
Big Bell Gold Operations has been fined $400,000 after a contract worker was injured while performing a task that wasn't covered in his safety induction. The supervising task manager was also untrained....
Read More
LOW REWARDS, HIGH STRESS DRIVE BURNOUT
A study by Sweden's Karolinska Institute has found that a high effort-reward imbalance (ERI) significantly increases the risk of workers burning out, but high demands are only part of the problem.
Read More