Research

New research from Japanese University claims work stress can lead to tooth loss

A study of 1,200 workers between the ages of 25 and 50 from the Japan's Asahikawa Medical University and Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry has found that workers experiencing workplace stress in the form of an effort-reward imbalance were interestingly found to be 20% more likely to have lost one of more teeth. However the association was somewhat remedied by supportive supervisors, managers and positive industrial relations.

The researchers found that chronic stress and caused a decline in the immune system of the worker, leading to tissue destruction.

According to the researchers, oral diseases like caries and periodontal disease are a major public health problem and cost about $266 billion worldwide in productivity loss each year.

The story peaked our interest as yet another piece of research detailing the direct relationship between a workers mental and physical health, at a time when Work Cover claims for stress and mental injuries are climbing year over year. It's vital for us to be able to always be drawing the health connections between the physical and the mental as a movement.

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