EU RECOMMENDS HUMAN OVERSIGHT TO ENHANCE DRONE SAFETY

The European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA) has suggested assigning ‘human supervisors’ for workplace drones can help reduce safety risks associated with their use.

Drones, also known as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), are increasingly being used in workplaces for various tasks, such as monitoring dangerous areas, delivering emergency tools, and conducting surveillance.

However, using drones in workplaces can create safety risks, including the potential for injuries from collisions, noise, and workers feeling they have little control over the drones' movements. To mitigate these risks, EU-OSHA recommends:

  • Thoroughly training workers who operate around drones on their capabilities.
  • Establishing clear communication interfaces between workers and drones, even for those not directly involved in drone operations.
  • Ensuring that workers can issue instructions to drones using simple language.
  • Assigning human supervisors to manage drones in the workplace, ensuring safe distances from workers, managing communications, and assessing worker comfort.

Ultimately, the goal is to integrate drones into workplaces in a way that ensures workers have the knowledge and tools to work alongside drones safely.

Access the EU-OSHA report here.

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