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USA: Apple, Dell, HP commit to protect workers from hazardous chemicals

After more than 40 years of working in Silicon Valley and around the world to promote  better worker protection from chemical hazards, three key electronics brands have just announced their commitment to significantly increase their protection of workers throughout the global supply chain.  

The Clean Electronics Production Network (CEPN) – which formed in 2016 and comprises the US EPA, major electronics companies, academia, NGOs and other stakeholders – launched the programme on 3 August with the three companies, which are CEPN members, announced as the founding signatories.

Some of the key points of the programme are:

  1. A commitment to zero exposure to hazardous chemicals to workers throughout the global electronics supply chain; 
  2. prioritise the elimination or substitution of priority chemicals with safer alternatives and continue to protect workers until that is achieved;
  3. collect data on the process chemicals used in manufacturing electronic products;
  4. advance worker engagement and participation as an essential element of a best-in-class safety culture for managing process chemicals;
  5. reach deeper into the overlapping and complex electronics supply chain to reduce worker exposure to hazardous chemicals; and
  6. verify and report on activities to ensure progress towards implementing the goals.

Source: Chemical Watch 

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