WORLD OHS CONGRESS: THREE PILLARS OF ACTION

The 23rd World Congress on Safety and Health at Work, has commenced in Sydney, with the International Labour Organisation (ILO) emphasising the urgency required to address work-related accidents and diseases.

The ILO has highlighted the increase in number of work-related deaths, with around three million workers losing their lives annually due to job-related factors.

The congress will host 3,000 individuals from 127 countries and is focused on a new strategy to improve health and safety globally.

This month the ILO adopted its new 2024-2030 global strategy. The report reveals most work-related deaths are due to diseases like circulatory, malignant neoplasms, and respiratory issues, accounting for about 2.6 million fatalities.

Additionally, approximately 330,000 workers perish due to work accidents, and 395 million suffer non-fatal injuries yearly. Factors like long working hours and exposure to hazardous materials contribute significantly to these statistics.

The ILO has made workplace safety a fundamental right, obligating member states like Australia to develop and maintain a safe and healthy work environment.

The ILO’s strategy aims to enhance national occupational safety and health (OSH) frameworks, promote coordination and investment in OSH, and improve workplace safety management systems.

The congress is an opportunity for global experts and Australia's OHS specialists to collaborate, share experiences, and work towards reducing workplace deaths and injuries.

Access the ILO report here

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