EUROPEAN UNIONS COLLABORATE ON CHEMICAL RISKS

The 19th annual seminar on workers' protection from chemical exposure took place in Brussels recently, bringing together trade unionists from 15 European countries.

The main focus was coordinating trade union efforts to prevent chemical risks at work.

Discussions revolved around the revisions of various directives related to asbestos, carcinogens, mutagens, reprotoxic substances, and chemical agents. The aim is to introduce new or updated occupational exposure limit (OEL) values for asbestos, lead and its derivatives, and di-isocyanates.

Participants were informed about a new political agreement that sets the limit value for asbestos at 2,000 fibres per m³, which is significantly lower than the current limit value and the initial proposal by the European Commission.

Other topics included the exposure of workers to endocrine disruptors, the fatal accident at a plant in Slovenia, the process of setting OELs for carcinogens in EU legislation, and studies on workers' exposure to carcinogens conducted in six European countries.

Attendees also received an update on the 'EU Guidance for the safe management of Hazardous Medicinal Products,' which aims to prevent occupational cancers and reproductive disorders in the healthcare sector.

Source: etui

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