TECHNO-STRESS LINKED TO BURNOUT IN HOSPITAL WORKERS

Researchers have found a significant association between workplace ‘technostressors’ and burnout symptoms, emphasizing better prevention and intervention strategies are needed to reduce risk of technology-related stress.

The term ‘technostressors’ refers to sources of stress related to the use of digital information and communication technologies in the workplace.

Examples of technostressors include information overload, excessive work demands due to technology, complex technological systems, uncertainty about technology, interruptions from digital devices, and the need to multitask with digital tools.

Technostressors can have a significant impact on employee well-being, job satisfaction, productivity, and overall work performance.

The use of digital information and communication technologies in workplaces can have positive and negative effects on worker well-being with Healthcare professionals, who already face high work stress, at particular risk.

The study, conducted from the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich in Germany, examined the relationship between technostressors and burnout symptoms, focusing on ‘hindrance technostressors’ such as techno-overload, techno-complexity, and digital interruptions.

The majority of these technostressors showed a harmful relationship with burnout symptoms, even when general work overload was taken into account. Techno/information overload and techno-complexity were also associated with secondary burnout symptoms like headaches.

The researchers concluded information overload caused by digital technology use is a distinct work stressor with genuine consequences for psychological health and recommend implementing strategies such as establishing norms, improving digital literacy, and providing accessible and efficient IT support to help cope with technostress.

Workplace physical exercise interventions have also proven useful in reducing employee burnout in general.

Access the full study here

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